Journalism

The current President of the United States has said among their most intimate circles that you plan to go to the nation, as the farewell ceremony, to apologize for the shame of Guantanamo and the illegal war in Iraq. It is also rumored that the executives of the banks have agreed to alleviate the current crisis by donating the profits that have been reported them the years of bonanza. His Holiness Benedicto XVI, for his part, has married secretly with a young stewardess somali. Every day appear in the media hundreds of news so wild as these whose veracity, theme, approach and exposure are adapted very little to the deontological codes of journalism. The purpose of journalism is the search for truth. Its raison d ‘ etre is to look, see, and telling what happens before us.

This journalist should be limited to collecting data and verifying them. Sort them and expose them with simplicity and sense will do that the message can be understood by the reader or listener. We are witnessing a phenomenon that opposes all journalistic ethics, led by the growth of internet and the anonymity it allows. It is journalism of the rumor, the curiosity of the inventiveness of the most absurd news still, where the contrast of the information has no place. A few weeks ago the Moroccan newspaper L Observateur said the son expected by the French Minister of Justice had been designed by the former Spanish President Jose Maria Aznar.

It is a free, lacking assertion of evidence, and with little importance or social significance. Internet made it possible that in a matter of hours news it’s expanded like a river of gunpowder to the point that the own hint by defamation issued a statement that refuted the news. The journalist, correspondent for the New York Times, Jon Lee Anderson argues that journalists are the only intermediaries between the public, which has no power, and decision-makers, who do have it.