Conventional Power Generation

Brief analysis of the imap Institute by the 06.05.2009 Turkey’s energy policy is located in a great change. Currently, the country covers only 28% of energy needs from domestic sources. Due to expected tremendous economic and population growth of over the next years, consumption growth in primary energy needs is predicted by 6,2%/a and in electricity consumption to 8,1%/a. In this process, renewable energies are increasingly gaining importance. If you would like to know more then you should visit BSA. Introduction the Turkey as a country of investment is no longer a secret tip. Long has shown the holiday destination due to the EU accession efforts and gradually adapting to European standards as a strong economic partner for European companies. However, areas in which, it is worth investing? The imap Institute examined the potential for investment in conventional energy and alternative energies in Turkey under cover in collaboration with his Office of Turkey in Ankara on the year 2008. In Turkey, the issue is renewable energy interest.

So is as from November 5-8 this year the environmental and energy fair RENEX in Istanbul held. Deutsche Messe Hannover hosts this new trade fair together with its Turkish partner of Hannover-Messe Sodeks Fuarcilik A.S., Istanbul. There are geothermal energy, water supply and disposal, recycling and environmental technologies, hot water extraction, and biofuels this year the focus is on solar power systems, wind energy systems, wind energy. The Turkish energy sector in the growing economy of Turkey and the population growing stronger in comparison to Western Europe, lead to an increased use of energy in the country. The energy requirement increases annually by about 8 percent. It could be not always covered already in the past, so that during the summer power outages were the result. Increasing energy shortages are expected in the future. Among others, the Administration sought to resolve these problems through privatization and liberalization of the power generation and supply. Currently Turkey has to import about two-thirds of its energy needs.